Triangle Offense


Where UST lost it and UP had it. by _celestial
August 21, 2009, 12:24 am
Filed under: Basketball, College Hoops | Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
The UST Tigers succumbed to their ‘usual’ second half collapse by squandering a whopping 31-point lead, but ultimately escaped with a 93-88 hard fought victory over the pesky UP Maroons earlier today.
The Tigers took control early in the game as they surged to a 16-2 blitz in the first quarter and kept the Maroons at bay in the entire second period with virtually every member of UST at the firing end, en route to the biggest lead posted against the maroons the entire season (the last was by UE at 30).
Top MVP candidate Dylan Ababou and sniper Tata Bautista exploded for 40 points combined in that feat, all before the UST Salinggawi Dance Troup gave their rather amusing performance at the half, 55-28.
Ababou finished with 23 points.
Coach Lawrence Chongson of the UE Red Warriors said in an interview last summer (Not his exact words) that “it’s always hard playing the lead.” I didn’t totally believe so, but after seeing UST’s unfortunate second half meltdown, I couldn’t be more convinced.
In the recent years, UST has always had this problem of keeping their lead after they come out of that locker. I have always wondered what Coach Pido Jarencio tells them at halftime that makes their game a far cry from what transpired just 10 minutes earlier in the ballgame.
Today he commended the boys for a job well done in the first half then UST zoomed to its biggest lead at 31 on Camus’ charities, with less than a minute shaved off the clock in the third.
But that Coach Pido’s praises didn’t come through for UST’s players.
That’s where UST lost it and UP had it.
Tigers’ rookie Marco Cam, who probably spent about .10 seconds on the floor, gave out a cheap, unnecessary body shot to Maroon’s Alvin Padilla, causing him to be thrown out of the planet.
From then on, the Tigers started playing their nasty, sloppy game (which I warned you about in yesterday’s predictions) throwing the leather like they were playing American football, for crying out loud! Seven straight turnovers, totaling to 11 in the third quarter against only one by the Maroons, led by Khasim “the missing act” Mirza, who seemed to be having a lot of problems holding on to the ball.
This is surprising knowing that UP turns over the ball more than…Wait, I’ll think of something. But they did turnover the ball nine times in just the second quarter, but they held on firmly to the ball when it mattered.
However, the ‘Fighting Maroons’ finally gave justice to their name by not giving up on each play despite being down by double digits. They executed the full court press effectively that obviously rattled the Tigers, they forced turnovers that they converted to baskets, they contested shots and most importantly, they made their shots!
As much as I hate to write about Woody Co, I just couldn’t avoid this moment. Co was responsible for UP’s valiant comeback, including that off-the-glass triple that cut UST’s lead to seven points with still 26 seconds left. Anything can happen to the UAAP and they were still able to cut it down to five points.
Co even had a chance to cut the deficit even further with eight seconds left after that very sill foul by Khasim Mirza on the rainbow territory. But Co didn’t deliver, missing 2 of his 3 charities.
Time wasn’t on UP’s side (in TJ Manotoc’s words, “they were 30 seconds too late”). UST went on winning the game in a very unflattering fashion that, I’m guessing, made Coach Pido yell until his eyeballs popped or his vocal chords sacked.
But, trust me, we can’t blame him.

The UST Tigers succumbed to their ‘usual’ second half collapse by squandering a whopping 31-point lead, but ultimately escaped with a 93-88 hard fought victory over the pesky UP Maroons earlier today.

The Tigers took control early in the game as they surged to a 16-2 blitz in the first quarter and kept the Maroons at bay in the entire second period with virtually every member of UST at the firing end, en route to the biggest lead posted against the maroons the entire season (the last was by UE at 30).

Top MVP candidate Dylan Ababou and sniper Tata Bautista exploded for 40 points combined in that feat, all before the UST Salinggawi Dance Troup (or the Yellow Jackets, whichever, I didn’t watch) gave theiramusing performance at the half, 55-28.

Ababou finished with 23 points.

Coach Lawrence Chongson of the UE Red Warriors said in an interview last summer (Not his exact words) that “it’s always hard playing the lead.” I didn’t totally believe so, but after seeing UST’s unfortunate second half meltdown, I couldn’t be more convinced.

In the recent years, UST has always had this problem of keeping their lead after they come out of that locker. I have always wondered what Coach Pido Jarencio tells them at halftime that makes their game a far cry from what transpired just 10 minutes earlier in the ballgame.

Today he commended the boys for a job well done in the first half then UST zoomed to its biggest lead at 31 on Camus’ charities, with less than a minute shaved off the clock in the third.

But that Coach Pido’s praises didn’t come through for UST’s players.

That’s where UST lost it and UP had it.

Tigers’ rookie Marco Cam, who probably spent about .10 seconds on the floor, gave out a cheap, unnecessary body shot to Maroon’s Alvin Padilla, causing him to be thrown out of the planet playing court.

While Ababou, who was playing perfect basketball in the first half, went into an early foul trouble. This forced Coach Pido to rely on his second stringers and play without his go-to-guy for the entire third quarter. Obviously, the Tigers couldn’t do without Ababou (LOL That rhymes). Their offense and their nonexistent defense went haywire.

The Tigers started playing their nasty, sloppy game (which I warned you about in yesterday’s predictions) throwing the leather like they were playing American football, for crying out loud! Seven straight turnovers, totaling to 11 in the third quarter against only one by the Maroons, led by Khasim “the missing act” Mirza, who seemed to be having a lot of problems holding on to the ball.

This is surprising knowing that UP turns over the ball more than…Wait, I’ll think of something. But they did turnover the ball nine times in just the second quarter, but they held on firmly to the ball when it mattered.

The ‘Fighting Maroons’ finally gave justice to their name by not giving up on each play despite being down by double digits. They executed the full court press effectively that obviously rattled the Tigers, they forced turnovers that they converted to baskets, they contested shots and most importantly, they made their shots!

As much as I hate to write about Woody Co, I just couldn’t avoid this moment. Co was responsible for UP’s valiant comeback, including that off-the-glass triple that cut UST’s lead to seven points with still 26 seconds left. Anything can happen to the UAAP and they were still able to cut it down to five points.

Co even had a chance to cut the deficit further with eight ticks left after that very silly foul by Khasim Mirza in the act of shooting. But lucky for them, Co didn’t deliver, missing 2 of his 3 charities.

Time wasn’t on UP’s side (in TJ Manotoc’s words, “they were 30 seconds too late”). UST went on winning the game in a very unflattering fashion that, I’m guessing, made Coach Pido yell until his eyeballs popped out of their sockets.

But, trust me, we can’t blame him.

&

FEU Tamaraws reigned anew over the NU Bulldogs, 76-66, to share first place lead (8-1) with Ateneo Blue Eagles. FEU’s troika of Reil Cervantes, Aldrech Ramos and Andy Barroca led the way for the Tams while Kokoy Hermosisima paced the hardworking Bulldogs with a game high 24-points.

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